The Value of Pedagogical Preferences: A Case of Personality and Learning Environments in Higher Education

Authors

https://doi.org/10.17583/ijep.2020.5634

Keywords:


Downloads

Abstract

To improve learning outcomes, research evidence has accumulated regarding the principles of teaching and learning; however, students’ perceptions of teaching methods have received little scientific investigation toward enhanced quality of their learning. To provide a demonstration of the value of researching student perceptions of the learning environments in which they find themselves, a sample of preference ratings (n = 69) was examined to test the hypothesis there exist among the Five Factor personality dimensions correlates of preference ratings for three environments: teacher-led, independent-autonomous, and groups.  Results confirmed preference for group learning in our sample and statistically reliable zero-order positive correlations between group-based learning preference and both extraversion and openness scores and between preference for teacher-led environments and openness scores.  First-order correlations showed no significant changes in accounted preference variation when controlling the other personality factors scores.  These findings are discussed with respect to likely social-cognitive and neurodevelopmental bases of group learning effectiveness and the utility of investigating student preferences for improving the quality of learning.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

References

Ashman, A. F., & Gillies, R. (2003). Cooperative learning: The social and intellectual outcomes of learning in groups. London: Routledge.

Google Scholar Crossref

Ausubel, D. P. (1968). Educational psychology: A cognitive view. New York: Holt Rhinehart and Winston.

Google Scholar Crossref

Biggs, J. B. (1987). Study process questionnaire manual. Hawthorn, Vic: Australian Council for Educational Research.

Google Scholar Crossref

Biggs, J. B., Kember, D., & Leung, D. Y. P. (2001). The revised two-factor Study Process Questionnaire: R-SPQ-2F. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 71, 133-149.

Google Scholar Crossref

Biggs, J. B., & Tang, C. (2011). Teaching for quality learning at university (4th ed.). Berkshire: Open University Press.

Google Scholar Crossref

Blakemore, S.-J., & Robbins, T. W. (2012). Decision-making in the adolescent brain. Nature Neuroscience, 15(9), 1184-1191.

Google Scholar Crossref

Chamorro-Premuzic, T., Furnham, A., Dissout, G., & Heaven. P. (2005). Personality and preference for academic assessment: A study with Australian university students. Learning and Individual Differences, 15, 247-256.

Google Scholar Crossref

Chamorro-Premuzic, T., Furnham, A., & Lewis, M. (2007). Personality and approaches to learning predict preferences for different teaching methods. Learning and Individual Differences, 17, 241-250.

Google Scholar Crossref

Choudhury, S., Charman, T., & Blakemore, S. J. (2008). Development of the teenage brain. Mind, Brain, & Education, 2(3), 142– 147.

Google Scholar Crossref

Costa, M. L. Ransberg, L. V., & Rushton, N. (2007). Does teaching style matter? A randomized trial of group discussion versus lectures in orthopaedic undergraduate teaching. Medical Education, 41, 214-217. doi: 10.1111-j.1365-2929.2006.02677.x

Google Scholar Crossref

Costa, P. T., Jr., & McCrae, R. (1992) Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and NEO Five-factor Inventory (NEO-FFI): Professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources Inc.

Google Scholar Crossref

Curry, L. (1983). An organisation of learning styles theory and constructs. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Quebec.

Google Scholar Crossref

Curry, L. (1990). One critique of the research on learning styles. Educational Leadership, 48, 50-56.

Google Scholar Crossref

Duff, A., Boyle, E., & Dunleavy, K., & Ferguson, J. (2004). The relationship between personality, approach to learning, and academic performance. Personality and Individual Differences, 36, 1907-1920.

Google Scholar Crossref

Dunn, R., Dunn, K., & Price, G. (1989). Learning style inventory. Lawrence, Kansas: Price Systems.

Google Scholar Crossref

Entwistle, N. (2019). Contributions of educational psychology to understanding student learning: What has been discovered – what more could be done? The Psychology of Education Review, 43(1), 9-19.

Google Scholar Crossref

Eysenck, H. J. (1992). Four ways five factors are not basic. Personality and Individual Differences, 13(6), 667–673.

Google Scholar Crossref

Felder, R. M. (1993). Reaching the Second Tier: Learning and Teaching Styles in College Science Education, Journal of College Science Teaching, 23(5), 286-290.

Google Scholar Crossref

Felder, R. M., & Spurlin, J. E. (2005). Applications, Reliability, and Validity of the Index of Learning Styles, International Journal of Engineering Education, 21, 103-112.

Google Scholar Crossref

Fraser, B. J. (2014). Classroom learning environments: Historical and contemporary perspectives. In N. G. Lederman & S. K. Abell (Eds.), Handbook of research on science education (Vol. II, pp. 104–117). New York: Routledge.

Google Scholar Crossref

Frey, N., Fisher, D., & Everlove, S. (2009). Productive group work: How to engage students, build teamwork, and promote understanding. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development.

Google Scholar Crossref

Friedman, P., & Alley, R. (1984). Learning/teaching styles: Applying the principles. Theory into Practice, 77, 77-81.

Google Scholar Crossref

Furnham, A. (1992). Personality and learning style: A study of three instruments. Personality and Individual Differences, 13, 429-438.

Google Scholar Crossref

Furnham, A. (2011). Personality and approaches to learning. In T. Chamorro-Premuzic, S. von Stumm, & A. Furnham (Eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Individual Differences (pp. 588-607). Chichester: Wiley.

Google Scholar Crossref

Gardner, M. & Steinberg, L. (2005). Peer influence on risk taking, risk preference, and risky decision making in adolescence and adulthood: an experimental study. Developmental Psychology, 41, 625–635.

Google Scholar Crossref

Halpern, D. F., & Hakel, M. D. (2003). Applying the Science of Learning to the University and Beyond, teaching for Long-term Retention and Transfer. Change, 37, 37-41.

Google Scholar Crossref

Honey, P., & Mumford, A. (1992). The manual of learning styles. Berkshire, England: Honey, Ardingly House.

Google Scholar Crossref

Horak, V. M., & Horak, W. J. (1982). The influence of student locus of control and teaching method on mathematics achievement. Journal of Experimental Education, 51, 18-21.

Google Scholar Crossref

House, J. D. (2005). Classroom instruction and science achievement in Japan, Hong Kong, and Chinese Taipei: Results from the TIMSS 1999 assessment. International Journal of Instructional Media, 32(3), 295– 311.

Google Scholar Crossref

Hulley, S. B., Cummings, S. R., Browner, W. S., Grady, D., & Newman, T. B. (2013). Designing clinical research: an epidemiologic approach (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Google Scholar Crossref

Jackson, C., & Lawtey-Jones, M. (1996) Explaining the overlap between personality and learning styles. Personality and Individual Differences, 20(3), 293-300.

Google Scholar Crossref

Jensen, J. L., Holt, E. A., Sowards, J. B., Ogden, T. H., & West, R. E. (2018). Investigating strategies for pre-class content learning in a flipped classroom, Journal of Science Education and Technology, 27, 523-535.

Google Scholar Crossref

Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, R. T. (2009). An educational psychology success story: Social interdependence theory and cooperative learning. Educational Researcher, 38(5), 365-379.

Google Scholar Crossref

Johnson, D. W., Johnson, E. J., & Holubec, E. J. (2008). Cooperation in the classroom (2nd ed.). Edina: Interaction Book Company.

Google Scholar Crossref

Khine, M. S., Fraser, B. J., Afari, E., Oo, Z., & Kyaw, T. T. (2017). Students’ perceptions of the learning environment in tertiary science classrooms in Myanmar. Learning Environments Research, 21, 135-152. doi: 10.1007/s10984-017-9250-0

Google Scholar Crossref

Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Google Scholar Crossref

Lake, W., Boyd, W., & Boyd, W. (2017). Understanding how students study: The genealogy and conceptual basis of a widely used pedagogical research tool, Biggs’ study process questionnaire. International Education Studies, 10(5), 100-108. doi:10.5539/ies.v10n5p100

Google Scholar Crossref

Law, Y. (2008). Effects of cooperative learning on second graders’ learning from text. Educational Psychology, 28(5), 567– 582.

Google Scholar Crossref

LeDoux, J. E. (2002). The synaptic self: How our brains become who we are. New York: Viking.

Google Scholar Crossref

Marton, F. (2015). The necessary conditions of learning. London: Routledge.

Google Scholar Crossref

Matthews, D. B., & Jones, M. C. (1994). An investigation of the learning styles of students in teacher education programs. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 21, 234-246.

Google Scholar Crossref

Matthews, G., Dreary, I. J., & Whiteman, M. C. (2003). Personality traits (2nd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Google Scholar Crossref

McCrae, R. R., Kurtz, J. E., Yamagata, S., & Terracciano, A. (2010). Internal consistency, retest reliability and their implications for personality scale validity. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 15(1), 28-50.

Google Scholar Crossref

Murphy, R. J., Gray, S. A., Straja, S. R., & Bogert, M. C. (2004). Student learning preferences and teaching implications. Journal of Dental Education, 68(8) 859-866.

Google Scholar Crossref

Nokes-Malach, T. J., Richey, E., & Gadgil, S. (2015). When is it better to learn together? Insight from research on collaborative learning. Educational Psychology Review, 27, 645-656.

Google Scholar Crossref

Öhrstedt, M., & Scheja, M. (2018). Targeting efficient studying – first semester psychology students’ experiences. Educational Research, 60(1), 80-96.

Google Scholar Crossref

Parent, J., Forward, J., Cantor, R., & Mohling, J. (1975). Interactive teaching effects of learning style and personal locus of control on student performance and satisfaction. Journal of Educational Psychology, 67, 764-769.

Google Scholar Crossref

Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 9, 105-119.

Google Scholar Crossref

Piaget, J. (1970). Science of education and the psychology of the child. D. Coltman (trans). Oxford, England: Orion.

Google Scholar Crossref

Riener, C., & Willingham, D. (2010). The myth of learning styles. Change, 42(5), 32-35.

Google Scholar Crossref

Skinner, E., & Furrer, C., & Marchand, G., & Kindermann, T. (2008). Engagement and disaffection in the classroom: Part of a larger motivational dynamic? Journal of Educational Psychology, 100(4), 765-781.

Google Scholar Crossref

Stander, J., Grimmer, K., & Brink, Y. (2019). Learning styles of physiotherapists: A systematic scoping review. BMC Medical Education, 19(1), 2-10. doi:10.1186/s12909-018-1434-5

Google Scholar Crossref

Sternberg, R. J., Grigorenko, E. L., & Zhang, L. (2008). Styles of learning and thinking matter in instruction and assessment. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3, 486-506.

Google Scholar Crossref

Swanberg, A. B., & Martinsen, O. L. (2010). Personality, approaches to learning and achievement. Educational Psychology, 30(1), 75-88.

Google Scholar Crossref

Vermette, P. J., & Kline, C. L. (2017). Group work that works: Student Collaboration for 21st Century Success. London: Routledge.

Google Scholar Crossref

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Google Scholar Crossref

Wise, R.A. (2004). Dopamine, learning and motivation. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 5, 483–494.

Google Scholar Crossref

Zhang, L. F. (2002). Thinking styles and the Big Five Personality Traits. Educational Psychology, 22(1), 17-31.

Google Scholar Crossref

Downloads

Published

2020-10-24

Almetric

Dimensions

How to Cite

Davies, J. L., & Wilson, T. L. (2020). The Value of Pedagogical Preferences: A Case of Personality and Learning Environments in Higher Education. International Journal of Educational Psychology, 9(3), 269–289. https://doi.org/10.17583/ijep.2020.5634

Issue

Section

Articles