Student Interest and Engagement in Middle School Physical Education: Examining the Role of Needs Supportive Teaching

Authors

  • Joseph Opiri Otundo University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Alex C Garn Louisiana State University

https://doi.org/10.17583/ijep.2019.3356

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Abstract

This study examines the complexities of the social learning environment in middle school physical education. Specifically, we investigate the independent and interactive predictive effects of situational interest and needs supportive teaching on students’ personal interest and class engagement. Middle school students (N = 388) in compulsory physical education courses completed questionnaires on situational interest, needs supportive teaching, personal interest, and behavioral and emotional engagement. Results from structural equation modeling tests revealed independent predictive effects of situational interest and needs supportive teaching on personal interest, and behavioral and emotional engagement. There was also an interactive effect between situational interest and needs supportive teaching on personal interest. This association was conditional on a minimum level of needs support in the social learning environment. To date, the conceptualization of situational interest has focused on student – activity interactions; however, our findings highlight the importance of social learning environment on student – activity interactions.

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Author Biographies

Joseph Opiri Otundo, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Dr. Joseph Otundo is an Assistant Professor of Health Education and Promotion in the school of Counseling, Human Performance, and Rehabilitation at University of Arkansas at Little Rock, AR, USA. Joseph is a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES). 

Joseph's research is Physical activity Motivation, Physical Activity and health Education pedagogy, Green exercises, global trends in Health Education and Promotion. He has presented papers at regional, national, and international conferences. His work has been published in peer reviewed journals. 

Alex C Garn, Louisiana State University

Associate Professor, School of Kinesiolgy

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Published

2019-06-24

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How to Cite

Otundo, J. O., & Garn, A. C. (2019). Student Interest and Engagement in Middle School Physical Education: Examining the Role of Needs Supportive Teaching. International Journal of Educational Psychology, 8(2), 137–161. https://doi.org/10.17583/ijep.2019.3356

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